New York

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New York Travel Guide

City Map

City Introduction

The New York metropolis, also known as the Big Apple, is the epitome of the United States and much of what the United States stands for in diversity, opportunities and freedom. It is an international metropolis that attracts tourists from all over the world all year round, and there is always something exciting to see and do in this, the largest American city.

Upon entering the city the Statue of Liberty stands as a symbol of the land of the free and the American dream, which has always been popular among immigrants and tourists alike. The statue goddess overlooks Manhattan’s mix of the many classic and modern skyscrapers, bridges, rivers and many other sights and features.

It was in New York and Chicago, the world’s first and tallest classic high-rise buildings were built, and it happened fast and ever higher through the 20th century. Among the most famous skyscrapers, you can see the Chrysler Building and the Empire State Building from the peak of skyscraper designs on the first part of the 1900s. One World Trade Center is the tallest and the most famous modern high-rise in the city.

New York is also synonymous with shopping malls and great food. Walk the elegant Fifth Avenue or the world’s largest department store, Macy’s, and enjoy the cityscape with cafes and restaurants from all over the world. It is never far to another good cafe or place to eat in the various ethnic neighborhoods.

Top Attractions

Empire State Building, New York

  • Empire State Building: This is a 443 meter/1,454 foot high art deco skyscraper built as the tallest in the world in the years 1929-1931. From an altitude of 320 meters/1,039 feet, you can enjoy unparalleled views of New York. And enjoy the style of the building on the way up.
  • Times Square: Times Square is named after the New York Times, which built its headquarters here in 1904. Today, it is a famous place in the streets of New York, and it serves as a kind of city center.

Brooklyn Bridge, New York

  • Brooklyn Bridge: The beautiful Brooklyn Bridge was built 1869-1883 by German John Augustus Roebling as the world’s first steel suspension bridge. The bridge is one of New York’s famous buildings, and you can cross the bridge on a gangway over the driveways.
  • Chrysler Building: The Chrysler Building is one of New York’s most famous skyscrapers. It was built by automaker Walter P. Chrysler as the world’s tallest. The sleek skyscraper is also considered one of the most beautiful high-rise buildings.

Grand Central Station, New York

  • Grand Central Station: This is New York’s colossal Central Station, inaugurated in 1913. The style is impressive beaux arts like several other contemporary grand constructions. The interior of not least the large train station hall is very beautiful.
  • The Metropolitan Museum of Art: The New York Museum of Modern Art, MoMA, is among the world’s leaders of its kind, and the colossal collection spans paintings, sculptures, industrial design and more from 1880 to the present day.
  • Cathedral of Saint John the Divine: In 1888 a competition was published for the construction of the Cathedral of Saint John the Divine. The foundation stone was laid in 1892 and construction is still going on. The building process is inspired by Gothic cathedrals in Europe.

Other Attractions

Battery Park, New York

  • Battery Park: Battery Park is a beautifully situated oasis from which there is a lovely view over the water and to the skyscrapers in the financial district. Battery Park is named after the cannon batteries that were here earlier as a naval defense.
  • World Trade Center: The current World Trade Center is a building complex with the 541-meter/1.792-foot-high One World Trade Center as the lead building. The complex is located in the area where the twin towers of the former World Trade Center were located until September 11, 2001. The building is also known as the Freedom Tower.
  • Saint Paul’s Chapel: Built in 1766, this charming church was located outside the city at the time and served as a church for those living in the countryside. The building style is Georgian and the interior is certainly worth seeing.

Flatiron Building, New York

  • Flatiron Building: The Flatiron Building was erected in 1903 as the tallest building in the world. It was one of the first modern skyscrapers to use the steel skeleton to reach the hitherto unseen heights.
  • Woolworth Building: The Woolworth Building is one of New York’s oldest, most beautiful, and most famous high-rise buildings. The house was built 1910-1913, and the style was inspired by Europe’s impressive Gothic architecture.

City Hall, New York

  • City Hall: New York City Hall from 1812 is one of the city’s most elegant buildings, and it is located in the middle of a lovely green oasis that surrounds the building, named City Hall Park. The building style is like a 19th century mansion from the southern states of the United States.
  • Manhattan Bridge: The mighty bridge Manhattan Bridge is one of the great old bridges over the East River between the boroughs of Manhattan and Brooklyn. The suspension bridge was opened in 1909 and it is a construction with two levels across the water.

Intrepid Sea-Air-Space Museum, New York

  • Intrepid Sea-Air-Space Museum: This is a museum formed around the American aircraft carrier USS Intrepid, which was in active service 1943-1974. It is now a museum with various effects such as several types of aircraft.
  • South Street Seaport: South Street Seaport is a central part of New York’s Old Port area, today renovated and featuring a variety of activities. Pier 17 is, for example, a center with a number of shops and restaurants.
  • Rockefeller Center: This is an art deco complex of buildings that John D. Rockefeller built in the years 1930-1939. The buildings are beautiful and there are many activities and events taking place around the Rockefeller Center.

Central Park, New York

  • Central Park: Central Park is New York’s large city park measuring 4,000×800 meters/2.5×0.5 miles. The park was laid out by the city council in 1853 and constructed the following years. You can go for many lovely walks on the lawns and among statues, museums and much more.
  • Harlem: The district Harlem is named after the Dutch city of Haarlem. The district exudes good atmosphere, and the central street is 125th Street, where you can see the Apollo Theater.

Day Trips

Statue of Liberty, New York

  • Statue of Liberty: This is the Statue of Liberty standing on an island at the entrance to New York. The goddess was erected in 1886 as a gift from the French people, and the 46-meter/151-foot-tall statue stands today as a symbol of freedom and as a landmark of New York and the United States.
  • Ellis Island: The small Ellis Island is the place where up to a third of the ancestors of the United States population first entered American soil. It is an island that was the central reception center for immigrants in the period 1892-1924.
  • Staten Island: Staten Island is an island that is part of New York. After a trip with the Staten Island Ferry, you arrive in almost rural areas with peaceful housing, parks and golf courses. Along the way, you can enjoy the view of the New York skyline.

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA

  • Philadelphia: The city of Philadelphia is one of the largest cities in the United States, and it was the country’s capital a short transition after New York and before Washington. There are many things to see in the city, where the sights include Independence Hall and Liberty Bell.

Shopping

With Kids

City History

European history begins
New York’s settled history begins with the first European to come to the interior of present-day New York. It was the Italian Giovanni da Verrazzano, and it happened in 1524. However, a settlement was not established on this occasion, as Verrazzano sailed on after, among other things, a meeting with the Lenape tribe who lived in the area.

Verrazzano later gave the first urban area the first European name; Nouvelle-Angoulême. It was in honor of the French king, who besides the royal title was the Count of Angoulême.

Hudson’s Settlement
In September 1609, the Dutch ship Halve Maen entered in what is today the port of New York. Captain was the Englishman Henry Hudson, who was in Dutch service to find a sea route west to Asia. They did not find the sought after route, but they noted a large population of beavers.

Beaver fur was the highest fashion in Europe, and with the beavers of the coastal country, there was a source of income that could be exploited by the Dutch. They built trading stations in the New World, and the value and significance of the beavers can be seen to this day in New York’s city arms.

The Dutch colonies were founded, and among them was a fur trading station at today’s Albany. In connection with it, the area around present-day Manhattan was strategically good with ice-free shipping of furs.

In 1624 the first Dutch came to the new colony, which lay on the Noten Eylandt; today’s Governors Island. The southern tip of Manhattan was also colonized and the colony was named Nieuw Amsterdam the same year. In 1625 Fort Amsterdam was established, and in 1625 Peter Minuit purchased Manhattan and Staten Island by the Algonquin Indians. It laid the foundation for the development of the site.

Trade and settlements were constantly expanded; among other things, by means of African slaves, who during the 1700s became a large part of the new population.

Among the more well-known Dutch, Petrus Stuyvesant, among others, came to the colony. It was in 1647, when he became its Director-General; a position he held until 1664. The Director General was appointed by the company Geoctroyeerde Westindische Compagnie, which was a West Indian trading company based in Amsterdam.

Stuyvesant came to characterize the city’s early growth history, expanding Nieuw Amsterdam to the north and thus beyond the original colony at the southern tip of Manhattan. Thus, a canal was built where Broad Street is today, a wall along Wall Street and Broadway itself.

Nieuw Amsterdam turns into New York
In 1664 British ships came to Nieuw Amsterdam and conquered the city, and formally Britain was assigned to the colony by the peace treaty in Breda, which in 1667 marked the end of the Second English-Dutch War. The city was renamed and now came to be called New York; named after the Duke of York.

A short transition, New York became Dutch again in 1673, but the final Dutch exit happened the year after the colony was swapped with Suriname in South America. New York then became a crown colony in 1685.

Towards Independence
Throughout the 18th century, the city was continuously expanded with construction of homes, churches, administrative buildings, harbor facilities, etc.

In the 1740s there lived about 10,000-15,000 including about 20% of African slaves. The population of the city increased significantly over the century, and by the first census that took place in 1790, 30,000 people lived here.

Of larger institutions that saw the light of day was the educational site of King’s College, named after British King Charles II, later named Columbia University.

Increasing activity was also evident in the busy port that secured New York a leading position in the upland and also in the war that was on the way.

In the 1760s, the British introduced additional taxation of the American colonies with The Stamp Act, and it led the period 7-25. October 1765 the The Stamp Act Congress, a meeting of representatives of several of the colonies. The meeting was held in New York and was the first major and coordinated protest with British rule.

United States Independence
In 1776, some North American colonies who wanted independence from England came to war. The Declaration of Independence itself had been adopted by the Continental Congress on July 4, 1776. With that declaration, 13 colonies in the present United States considered themselves independent and thus not part of the British Empire.

On August 27, 1776, the first real battle took place in the American War of Independence. General George Washington had defeated the British by a siege of Boston, and he went with his army to the strategically important port city, New York, to which the English could continually obtain supplies for the navy and the army sailed forward.

During the Battle of Long Island, the British won, which they repeated at the Battle of Fort Washington. New York was the British’s main bridgehead, and it was a loyal city to English rule.

Despite the defeat, with the end of the war, the United States became independent, and New York also became part of the country. British troops remained in the city until 1783, when George Washington came here at the same time as the British retreat of the last soldiers.

The new capital
War years had come at a distance, and the new country was to establish its own structures. In 1788, New York became the first capital of the United States, and in 1789 George Washington was inaugurated as the country’s first president at a ceremony in the Federal Hall on Wall Street. The first Supreme Court was also established here in the city, which was dominant in the US from the start. In 1790, however, the city’s status of capital passed to Philadelphia, and later Washington was established as a federal metropolitan area.

19th Century development
New York’s roots as a Dutch colony in the southern tip of Manhattan continued to be central to the city’s infrastructure, but large-scale growth and migration pushed for the city to expand significantly.

Thus, a visionary city plan from 1811 laid out all of northern Manhattan following a grid system for new urban areas, and the great immigration of the period created a great increase in population.

In 1819-1825, the city’s strategic position was strengthened with the construction of the Erie Canal waterway, which connected New York along the Hudson River and thus the city with the major agricultural areas of the Midwest and Canada. The new shipping route through Lake Erie, through the canal and to New York brought increased trade and growth.

The city was booming and people were moving to. In 1835, New York became the United States’ largest city with more than 150,000 inhabitants; thus Philadelphia had been overtaken in size.

In 1835, the old Dutch quarter burned to the ground, but the area was quickly redeveloped and there were virtually no limits to the growth of the city.

Large population groups joined; for example, many Irishmen who fled the famine in their homeland. New York’s share of Irish rose to a quarter in the mid-1850s, and new schools and other institutions were built for both them and other immigrants.

Civil War
During the American Civil War, the city sympathized with the north and the south. There were many good trade links and familial ties to the southern states, and in 1863 this led to great civil unrest. The retention of the American Union was muted and New York could continue its thriving development.

Late 19th Century
In the latter part of the 19th century, millions of European immigrants came to the United States, and most of them arrived through New York harbor. The first meeting with the United States was changed from 1886 with the erection of the Statue of Liberty, a gift from France on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of the United States.

New York’s area was expanded over several times up to 1900, and new neighborhoods like the Bronx were built. In 1898, Greater New York was created by the amalgamation of many municipalities, and the city’s population grew by that opportunity to 3.5 million. The large population and thriving economy created a great deal of pressure on Manhattan as the center, and building closer and higher. The first skyscrapers shot up, and the city’s subway opened in 1904.

Construction boom and stock market crash The
skyscrapers shot up, and Manhattan’s skyline changed with the many new buildings. Underground, the city’s first subway line opened in 1904, and over time the line network has expanded rapidly with the city counting more than 400 stations.

New York’s economic growth was slowed by the stock market crash of 1929, which began the 1930s depression. Time created endless queues of unemployed, poor New Yorkers. However, major construction projects such as the Empire State Building, inaugurated in 1931, were completed.

The post-war era to today
UN headquarters was located in New York after World War II. The subsequent period was marked by a slowdown and rising problems of crime and disharmony between ethnic groups. Many people moved to the new suburbs and companies moved.

By 1975, the city was nearing bankrupt, and in the 1980s development was stagnant at best. It wasn’t until the 1990s that the city’s budgets were surplus. New jobs were created and previously stressed areas were refurbished and made attractive again.

As two passenger aircraft flew into the World Trade Center’s two twin towers in New York, the entire world was affected and changed. Thousands were killed, and materially the city’s tallest buildings collapsed into gravel, leaving the site of the ground Zero, after a colossal cleanup, where a new skyscraper complex is erected with the usual American will and pursuit.

Today’s New York continues to be the gateway to many of the United States, and it is still the largest city in the United States with a global outlook not to be found anywhere in the world.

Geolocation

In short

Overview of New York

The New York metropolis, also known as the Big Apple, is the epitome of the United States and much of what the United States stands for in diversity, opportunities and freedom. It is an international metropolis that attracts tourists from all over the world all year round, and there is always something exciting to see and do in this, the largest American city.

 

Upon entering the city the Statue of Liberty stands as a symbol of the land of the free and the American dream, which has always been popular among immigrants and tourists alike. The statue goddess overlooks Manhattan’s mix of the many classic and modern skyscrapers, bridges, rivers and many other sights and features.

 

About the upcoming New York travel guide

  • Contents: Tours in the city + tours in the surrounding area
  • Published: Released soon
  • Author: Stig Albeck
  • Publisher: Vamados.com
  • Language: English

 

About the travel guide

The New York travel guide gives you an overview of the sights and activities of the American city. Read about top sights and other sights, and get a tour guide with tour suggestions and detailed descriptions of all the city’s most important churches, monuments, mansions, museums, etc.

 

New York is waiting for you, and at vamados.com you can also find cheap flights and great deals on hotels for your trip. You just select your travel dates and then you get flight and accommodation suggestions in and around the city.

 

Read more about New York and the USA

 

Buy the travel guide

Click the “Add to Cart” button to purchase the travel guide. After that you will come to the payment, where you enter the purchase and payment information. Upon payment of the travel guide, you will immediately receive a receipt with a link to download your purchase. You can download the travel guide immediately or use the download link in the email later.

 

Use the travel guide

When you buy the travel guide to New York you get the book online so you can have it on your phone, tablet or computer – and of course you can choose to print it. Use the maps and tour suggestions and you will have a good and content-rich journey.

Empire State Building • Statue of Liberty • Central Park • Brooklyn Bridge

Overview of New York

The New York metropolis, also known as the Big Apple, is the epitome of the United States and much of what the United States stands for in diversity, opportunities and freedom. It is an international metropolis that attracts tourists from all over the world all year round, and there is always something exciting to see and do in this, the largest American city.

 

Upon entering the city the Statue of Liberty stands as a symbol of the land of the free and the American dream, which has always been popular among immigrants and tourists alike. The statue goddess overlooks Manhattan’s mix of the many classic and modern skyscrapers, bridges, rivers and many other sights and features.

 

About the upcoming New York travel guide

  • Contents: Tours in the city + tours in the surrounding area
  • Published: Released soon
  • Author: Stig Albeck
  • Publisher: Vamados.com
  • Language: English

 

About the travel guide

The New York travel guide gives you an overview of the sights and activities of the American city. Read about top sights and other sights, and get a tour guide with tour suggestions and detailed descriptions of all the city’s most important churches, monuments, mansions, museums, etc.

 

New York is waiting for you, and at vamados.com you can also find cheap flights and great deals on hotels for your trip. You just select your travel dates and then you get flight and accommodation suggestions in and around the city.

 

Read more about New York and the USA

 

Buy the travel guide

Click the “Add to Cart” button to purchase the travel guide. After that you will come to the payment, where you enter the purchase and payment information. Upon payment of the travel guide, you will immediately receive a receipt with a link to download your purchase. You can download the travel guide immediately or use the download link in the email later.

 

Use the travel guide

When you buy the travel guide to New York you get the book online so you can have it on your phone, tablet or computer – and of course you can choose to print it. Use the maps and tour suggestions and you will have a good and content-rich journey.

Gallery

Gallery

Other Attractions

Battery Park, New York

  • Battery Park: Battery Park is a beautifully situated oasis from which there is a lovely view over the water and to the skyscrapers in the financial district. Battery Park is named after the cannon batteries that were here earlier as a naval defense.
  • World Trade Center: The current World Trade Center is a building complex with the 541-meter/1.792-foot-high One World Trade Center as the lead building. The complex is located in the area where the twin towers of the former World Trade Center were located until September 11, 2001. The building is also known as the Freedom Tower.
  • Saint Paul’s Chapel: Built in 1766, this charming church was located outside the city at the time and served as a church for those living in the countryside. The building style is Georgian and the interior is certainly worth seeing.

Flatiron Building, New York

  • Flatiron Building: The Flatiron Building was erected in 1903 as the tallest building in the world. It was one of the first modern skyscrapers to use the steel skeleton to reach the hitherto unseen heights.
  • Woolworth Building: The Woolworth Building is one of New York’s oldest, most beautiful, and most famous high-rise buildings. The house was built 1910-1913, and the style was inspired by Europe’s impressive Gothic architecture.

City Hall, New York

  • City Hall: New York City Hall from 1812 is one of the city’s most elegant buildings, and it is located in the middle of a lovely green oasis that surrounds the building, named City Hall Park. The building style is like a 19th century mansion from the southern states of the United States.
  • Manhattan Bridge: The mighty bridge Manhattan Bridge is one of the great old bridges over the East River between the boroughs of Manhattan and Brooklyn. The suspension bridge was opened in 1909 and it is a construction with two levels across the water.

Intrepid Sea-Air-Space Museum, New York

  • Intrepid Sea-Air-Space Museum: This is a museum formed around the American aircraft carrier USS Intrepid, which was in active service 1943-1974. It is now a museum with various effects such as several types of aircraft.
  • South Street Seaport: South Street Seaport is a central part of New York’s Old Port area, today renovated and featuring a variety of activities. Pier 17 is, for example, a center with a number of shops and restaurants.
  • Rockefeller Center: This is an art deco complex of buildings that John D. Rockefeller built in the years 1930-1939. The buildings are beautiful and there are many activities and events taking place around the Rockefeller Center.

Central Park, New York

  • Central Park: Central Park is New York’s large city park measuring 4,000×800 meters/2.5×0.5 miles. The park was laid out by the city council in 1853 and constructed the following years. You can go for many lovely walks on the lawns and among statues, museums and much more.
  • Harlem: The district Harlem is named after the Dutch city of Haarlem. The district exudes good atmosphere, and the central street is 125th Street, where you can see the Apollo Theater.

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