Toronto

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Toronto Travel Guide

City Map

City Introduction

Toronto is Canada’s largest city and it is a modern city, beautifully situated on the shores of Lake Ontario. There is something for everyone in Toronto, like metropolitan urban life, museums, historical sites and nature outings with a short drive to Niagara Falls as a popular day trip.

At the top of Toronto stands the 553 meter/1,815 feet high CN Tower, which is an impressive construction. The tour of the tower is a must for most visitors, and from its observation platforms there are unique views of the metropolis, the surrounding area and Lake Ontario.

Make a tour in Toronto’s history on several interesting places as well. At historic Fort York, the time is set back to the early 1800s, while the Royal Ontario Museum serves as a kind of national museum in the province with large collections in the fields of culture and nature. And enjoy the modern city center high-rise buildings as a part of the present day metropolitan experience.

If you want to go for a day trip from the city, the drive to Niagara Falls is a good choice. The US-Canada border is close to Toronto, and this is the place where the water constantly showers down the falls. The waterfall is easily accessible on a day trip with a lot of time to enjoy the tour from the Canadian metropolis.

Top Attractions

CN Tower, Toronto

  • CN Tower: CN Tower, which stands for the Canadian National Tower, is one of the tallest buildings in the world with its 553 meters/1,815 ft. It is Toronto’s landmark and there are great views from respectively 346 meters/1,135 ft and 447 meters/1,465 ft in height.
  • Historic Fort York: Fort York is one of Toronto’s major historic buildings. This is where you can experience the battle of York in 1813, where the fort played a significant role for the future of Toronto.

Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto

  • Royal Ontario Museum: The Royal Ontario Museum is Canada’s largest museum and definitely one of the country’s leading museums of high international level. The museum was founded in 1912 and depicts the world’s cultural and natural history.
  • St. James’ Cathedral: The Anglican St. James’ Cathedral is Toronto’s oldest religious building. It was founded in 1797, but opened only in 1853 as one of the city’s largest buildings. The tower was completed in 1874.

Casa Loma, Toronto

  • Casa Loma: Casa Loma means the House on the hill, and the location of the small castle is truly lovely with views of the city. Sir Henry Mill Pellatt hired architect Edward James Lennox to built the castle 1911-1914 as his residence.

Other Attractions

Osgoode Hall, Toronto

  • Osgoode Hall: Osgoode Hall is one of Toronto’s largest structures from the 19th century. The building was founded in 1829 by the province of Upper Canada’s legal authorities. The name comes from Supreme Court Judge William Osgoode.
  • Harbourfront Center: In a former warehouse area of ​​Toronto’s Port District, the lively and cozy Harbourfront Center has been developed. Warehouses have been restored and adapted for various cultural and commercial purposes.

St Lawrence Market, Toronto

  • St. Lawrence Market: The St. Lawrence Market dates back to 1803, when Governor Peter Hunter laid out the land for the purpose. The market was established and since 1901 it has been known as one of the country’s best food markets.
  • St. Michael’s Cathedral: St. Michael’s Cathedral is Toronto’s Roman Catholic cathedral. It was designed by architect William Thomas and built 1845-1848. The famous St. Michael’s Choir is affiliated with the church.

City Hall, Toronto

  • City Hall: Toronto’s City Hall is one of the city’s most distinctive buildings. The architect of the modernist building from 1965 was Viljo Revell from Finland. He designed the rectangular foundation with the curved high-rise buildings.
  • The Old City Hall: Toronto’s former City Hall was the seat of city government and administration from 1899 to the relocation to the current City Hall in 1965. The building is very impressive with its large-scale Neo-Romanesque architecture.

Chinatown, Toronto

  • Chinatown: Toronto’s Chinatown is located between the streets of College, Queen, Spadina and University. The many Chinese in the area have left their mark on the neighborhood with shops, restaurants and more.
  • Rogers Center: This is Toronto’s 1989 major arena, which was initially known as the SkyDome. Over the years, the arena has been home to many sports teams such as the Toronto Blue Jays and the Toronto Argonauts.

Ontario Legislative Buildings, Toronto

  • Ontario Legislative Buildings: Ontario’s parliament building was built in Neo-Romanesque style in 1886-1892. The architect for the well-visited buildings was the American Richard Waite.
  • Textile Museum of Canada: At the Canadian Textile Museum, a cultural understanding of different peoples and their way of life is seen through more than 10,000 garments and textiles from over 200 countries and regions.

Day Trips

Niagara Falls, Canada

  • Niagara Falls: The mighty Niagara Falls is one of nature’s wonders and an experience you will always remember. Every second, three million litres/ 750,000 gallons of water flow over the edge of the waterfall, which lies on the US-Canada border.
  • St. Catharines: The city of St. Catharines close to Niagara Falls is a gem of natural beauty and intriguing man-made constructions. The city, with its location, is also a kind of center for Ontario’s wine production.

Durdurn Castle, Hamilton

  • Hamilton: The city of Hamilton is beautifully located at the western end of Lake Ontario. The area of Hamilton Bay and a varied landscape is great for driving or hiking. You can also see a botanical garden and Dundurn Castle.
  • Brantford: This is a city with several attractions such as a reconstructed Native American village, Kanata Village, and the Bell Homestead National Historic Site, where Alexander Graham Bell made the first phone call.

Shopping

With Kids

City History

The Toronto region has been inhabited for millennia. As the ice age’s ice cap receded, settlers from the south came. The settlers were alone in the area for a long time.

The first Europeans arrived in the 1600s, but many years went from the first visit to actual European settlements. France, which sought to expand its colony of New France in present-day Québec, set up trading stations in the early 18th century, but it was Montréal who was the real city of the French.

After the English conquest and annexation of the French territories in Canada, a Toronto development began. In 1787, England purchased the entire area of ​​the Native American Mississaugas tribe and thus a colonization could take off.

It was a time of imminent opportunity for American invasion of English Canada. The United States was established and rapidly expanded its territories in a western direction. As part of the English defense, John Graves Simcoe established a military outpost in 1793 and at the same time founded a civilian city, which he called York. In the English province of Upper Canada, the smaller city of Niagara had been the capital, but the dangerous proximity to the United States meant that Simcoe granted York this status.

York remained a small village for many years, exposed to several American attacks. A development had not started and thus only 720 people lived in the city in 1814.

From 1815, the role of the city in Canada, and thus the general development, came as well. York became the capital of the colony, thereby establishing many common national institutions in the city. Others chose York as the city of establishment due to the density of the political center. This included, for example, banks and major educational establishments. Finally, York was also geographically well-positioned in relation to the Anglo-Canadian colonization to the west in the great Canadian hinterland.

In 1834, when York was merged with the Toronto neighborhood, nearly 10,000 people lived in York, which had been expanded in its area to accommodate the many new arrivals arriving each year. Around 1850, the population numbered about 30,000, and the city was Upper Canada’s largest.

The decades in the mid-1800s had offered many attacks against the city, but the city’s growth continued unabated. Cholera epidemics had erupted in 1832, 1834 and 1849, while an uprising had almost divided the city in the period 1837-1838. In 1847-1848 typhus hit the city, and in 1849 a major fire ravaged.

By 1853, the city’s first railway line was opened, and the modern city had been both sewered and had gas lighting and water lines installed. Significant buildings such as St. James’ Cathedral and St. Lawrence Hall was also erected during this period of growth. The city was developed according to modern principles with division into commercial areas and residential districts. During the period, the city also underwent greater industrialization.

After many decades of growth, the population numbered 200,000 in 1900, and through the first half of that century quadrupled, and Toronto began to become a competitor of Montreal in size and economics. Culturally, too, a development took place in the city, where The Royal Ontario Museum opened in 1912 and the Symphony in 1922.

During the two world wars, many of the city’s inhabitants participated on the English side. Of the city’s citizens, 78% were of English origin and were therefore more participatory than from other parts of Canada. After the end of World War II, many soldiers returned, and at the same time the first major wave of immigration began, causing the population to increase explosively over the following years.

The relatively small Toronto, with the waves of immigration, expanded in its area and created the breeding ground for many of the large facilities seen in both downtown and in the many newly constructed suburbs.

Toronto became Canada’s largest city in 1976, and today it is Canada’s financial center, where countless modern buildings, shopping malls and cultural institutions are an integral part of the experience. The city is considered to be one of the world’s most multicultural. Here, more than 150 languages ​​and dialects are spoken, and the different peoples live in harmony with each other.

In 1998, the city was merged with surrounding municipalities, bringing the number of citizens to 2.6 million, including the suburbs living here at nearly 5 million people, making the Toronto area one of North America’s major metropolises. The city is still growing and the last 100 years of significant population growth is expected to be sustained in the coming decades.

Geolocation

In short

Toronto travel guide

Overview of Toronto

Toronto is Canada’s largest city and it is a modern city, beautifully situated on the shores of Lake Ontario. There is something for everyone in the city, like metropolitan urban life, museums, historical sites and nature outings with a short drive to Niagara Falls as a popular day trip.

 

At the top of town stands the 553 meter/1,815 feet high CN Tower, which is an impressive construction. The tour of the tower is a must for most visitors, and from its observation platforms there are unique views of the metropolis, the surrounding area and Lake Ontario.

 

About the upcoming Toronto travel guide

  • Contents: Tours in the city + tours in the surrounding area
  • Published: Released soon
  • Author: Stig Albeck
  • Publisher: Vamados.com
  • Language: English

 

About the travel guide

The Toronto travel guide gives you an overview of the sights and activities of the Canadian city. Read about top sights and other sights, and get a tour guide with tour suggestions and detailed descriptions of all the city’s most important churches, monuments, mansions, museums, etc.

 

Toronto is waiting for you, and at vamados.com you can also find cheap flights and great deals on hotels for your trip. You just select your travel dates and then you get flight and accommodation suggestions in and around the city.

 

Read more about Toronto and Canada

 

Buy the travel guide

Click the “Add to Cart” button to purchase the travel guide. After that you will come to the payment, where you enter the purchase and payment information. Upon payment of the travel guide, you will immediately receive a receipt with a link to download your purchase. You can download the travel guide immediately or use the download link in the email later.

 

Use the travel guide

When you buy the travel guide to Toronto you get the book online so you can have it on your phone, tablet or computer – and of course you can choose to print it. Use the maps and tour suggestions and you will have a good and content-rich journey.

CN Tower • Museums • Lake Ontario • Niagara Falls

Toronto travel guide

Overview of Toronto

Toronto is Canada’s largest city and it is a modern city, beautifully situated on the shores of Lake Ontario. There is something for everyone in the city, like metropolitan urban life, museums, historical sites and nature outings with a short drive to Niagara Falls as a popular day trip.

 

At the top of town stands the 553 meter/1,815 feet high CN Tower, which is an impressive construction. The tour of the tower is a must for most visitors, and from its observation platforms there are unique views of the metropolis, the surrounding area and Lake Ontario.

 

About the upcoming Toronto travel guide

  • Contents: Tours in the city + tours in the surrounding area
  • Published: Released soon
  • Author: Stig Albeck
  • Publisher: Vamados.com
  • Language: English

 

About the travel guide

The Toronto travel guide gives you an overview of the sights and activities of the Canadian city. Read about top sights and other sights, and get a tour guide with tour suggestions and detailed descriptions of all the city’s most important churches, monuments, mansions, museums, etc.

 

Toronto is waiting for you, and at vamados.com you can also find cheap flights and great deals on hotels for your trip. You just select your travel dates and then you get flight and accommodation suggestions in and around the city.

 

Read more about Toronto and Canada

 

Buy the travel guide

Click the “Add to Cart” button to purchase the travel guide. After that you will come to the payment, where you enter the purchase and payment information. Upon payment of the travel guide, you will immediately receive a receipt with a link to download your purchase. You can download the travel guide immediately or use the download link in the email later.

 

Use the travel guide

When you buy the travel guide to Toronto you get the book online so you can have it on your phone, tablet or computer – and of course you can choose to print it. Use the maps and tour suggestions and you will have a good and content-rich journey.

Gallery

Gallery

Other Attractions

Osgoode Hall, Toronto

  • Osgoode Hall: Osgoode Hall is one of Toronto’s largest structures from the 19th century. The building was founded in 1829 by the province of Upper Canada’s legal authorities. The name comes from Supreme Court Judge William Osgoode.
  • Harbourfront Center: In a former warehouse area of ​​Toronto’s Port District, the lively and cozy Harbourfront Center has been developed. Warehouses have been restored and adapted for various cultural and commercial purposes.

St Lawrence Market, Toronto

  • St. Lawrence Market: The St. Lawrence Market dates back to 1803, when Governor Peter Hunter laid out the land for the purpose. The market was established and since 1901 it has been known as one of the country’s best food markets.
  • St. Michael’s Cathedral: St. Michael’s Cathedral is Toronto’s Roman Catholic cathedral. It was designed by architect William Thomas and built 1845-1848. The famous St. Michael’s Choir is affiliated with the church.

City Hall, Toronto

  • City Hall: Toronto’s City Hall is one of the city’s most distinctive buildings. The architect of the modernist building from 1965 was Viljo Revell from Finland. He designed the rectangular foundation with the curved high-rise buildings.
  • The Old City Hall: Toronto’s former City Hall was the seat of city government and administration from 1899 to the relocation to the current City Hall in 1965. The building is very impressive with its large-scale Neo-Romanesque architecture.

Chinatown, Toronto

  • Chinatown: Toronto’s Chinatown is located between the streets of College, Queen, Spadina and University. The many Chinese in the area have left their mark on the neighborhood with shops, restaurants and more.
  • Rogers Center: This is Toronto’s 1989 major arena, which was initially known as the SkyDome. Over the years, the arena has been home to many sports teams such as the Toronto Blue Jays and the Toronto Argonauts.

Ontario Legislative Buildings, Toronto

  • Ontario Legislative Buildings: Ontario’s parliament building was built in Neo-Romanesque style in 1886-1892. The architect for the well-visited buildings was the American Richard Waite.
  • Textile Museum of Canada: At the Canadian Textile Museum, a cultural understanding of different peoples and their way of life is seen through more than 10,000 garments and textiles from over 200 countries and regions.

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